Amnesty Indy
Local Group 317 is the Indianapolis chapter of Amnesty International USA: We meet at 7:00 pm the 3rd Wednesday of every month on the 1st floor of the historic Athenaeum located at 401 East Michigan Street downtown Indianapolis.

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September 18th, 8:22am 98 notes

Amnesty report: Nigerian police use torture tactics in policing

breakingnews:

Amnesty International: Nigeria’s police and military routinely torture women, men, and children using a wide range of methods including beatings, shootings and rape, Amnesty International said in a new report.

Follow more news on Nigeria at Breaking News

August 14th, 4:20pm 1,734 notes
amnestyusa:

Today we honor victims of police brutality in solidarity with Ferguson, MO. Join in the National Moment of Silence at 7:20pm tonight.
Independent investigations in Ferguson and New York are a start. But now is the time to end unnecessary and excessive force.

amnestyusa:

Today we honor victims of police brutality in solidarity with Ferguson, MO. Join in the National Moment of Silence at 7:20pm tonight.

Independent investigations in Ferguson and New York are a start. But now is the time to end unnecessary and excessive force.

July 25th, 8:57am
July 23rd, 7:57pm 335 notes
breakingnews:

Inmate takes 2 hours to die in Arizona execution
NBC News: An execution in Arizona took nearly two hours on Wednesday, and the inmate’s lawyers claimed he gasped and snorted for nearly an hour after it began.
Joseph Wood, who was condemned to death for fatally shooting his girlfriend and her father in 1989, was scheduled to be killed with a combination of midazolam and hydromorphone, the same drugs used in an Ohio execution in which the inmate took 25 minutes to die.

Follow updates on BreakingNews.com.
Photo: An unidentified Arizona Corrections Officer adjust straps of gurney used for lethal injection at the Florence Death House at the Arizona State Prison. (Arizona Dept. of Corrections via AP File)

breakingnews:

Inmate takes 2 hours to die in Arizona execution

NBC News: An execution in Arizona took nearly two hours on Wednesday, and the inmate’s lawyers claimed he gasped and snorted for nearly an hour after it began.

Joseph Wood, who was condemned to death for fatally shooting his girlfriend and her father in 1989, was scheduled to be killed with a combination of midazolam and hydromorphone, the same drugs used in an Ohio execution in which the inmate took 25 minutes to die.

Follow updates on BreakingNews.com.

Photo: An unidentified Arizona Corrections Officer adjust straps of gurney used for lethal injection at the Florence Death House at the Arizona State Prison. (Arizona Dept. of Corrections via AP File)

June 25th, 1:25pm
June 18th, 3:25pm

Tonight’s Meeting

Our 7pm meeting tonight will be in the Athenaeum’s Damenverien Room on the first floor instead of the Max Kade Director’s Room.

June 13th, 2:32pm 28,540 notes

policymic:

Activists cover anti-homeless spikes with cement

According to a Vice report, “a left-wing activist group” called the London Black Revolutionaries (LBR) decided to do some redecorating at a Tesco market on Regent Street, one of the sites with the so-called “anti-homeless studs.” Early Thursday morning, several vigilantes showed up outside the store in construction gear, covering the studs with cement.

Read more | Follow policymic

(Source: micdotcom, via npr)

June 5th, 9:00am 9,787 notes

nevver:

25 years ago June 4th, Tiananmen Square

(via wilwheaton)

June 4th, 9:01am 1 note

Previously unseen photos of 1989 Tiananmen Square movement are online as IUPUI digital collection

http://news.iupui.edu/releases/2014/06/tiananmen-square.shtml

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

INDIANAPOLIS — University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is making public more than 400 previously unseen black-and-white photographs of the historic student-led 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy movement. The library has digitized photographs taken by an IUPUI professor and added them to the library’s online digital collections.

It was April 15, 1989, when Hu Yaobang, the ousted general secretary of the Chinese Communist Party, died in Beijing. Thousands of people went to Tiananmen Square to mourn his death. College students in Beijing universities soon turned the mourning into a grassroots movement that called for political reform, including an end to government corruption and a guarantee of freedom of speech. The movement ended abruptly with the killing of hundreds of protesting Chinese citizens during a military crackdown on June 4, 1989.

Thousands of media professionals, along with ordinary citizens, captured the events of the student-led movement on camera. Nevertheless, relatively few of these images survived since the Chinese government confiscated cameras and film in its crackdown on the movement and its leaders.

The photographs in the University Library digital collection, “Tiananmen Square, 1989,” are exhibited in memory of those who died during the movement. The collection can also serve as an educational tool for younger generations to learn about that period of history visually.

The photographer, Edgar Huang, a faculty member from the IU School of Informatics and Computing on the Indianapolis campus, was then a university instructor and a documentary photographer in Beijing. He traveled almost every day to different university campuses and different locations in Beijing, especially Tiananmen Square, to record with his Nikon F3 all the exciting, frustrating and sad moments.

After the government crackdown, some of Huang’s negatives were confiscated, but more than 90 percent of his 54 rolls of 36mm film were carefully hidden in different locations in Beijing to avoid possible raids.

“Many young people in China have no recollection of what happened in Beijing in the spring/summer of 1989,” Huang said. “These photographs will serve as a reminder of numerous ordinary Beijing citizens’ bravery and are exhibited in memory of those who died.

“Thanks to my beloved late wife, Lily Sun, who brought the negatives to the United States in 1994, these photographs are now possible to be exhibited to the public.”

Huang expressed appreciation for the work of IUPUI University Library staff, especially Kristi L. Palmer, Jennifer Ann Johnson and Ann Lys Proctor, in making the digitization of all the negatives and eventually this online exhibition possible.

Located at 755 W. Michigan St. in the heart of the IUPUI campus, the University Library is a public library, serving nearly 1 million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users. University Library supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Any resident of Indiana is eligible for an IUPUI University Library card.

May 23rd, 1:31pm

I, Too, Will Stand Up for Tiananmen

By